What's New In Radio:

October 6th, 2010

QSR CASE STUDIES TO BE SHOWCASED AT RADIO SHOW SESSION

October 6th, 2010

QSR CASE STUDIES TO BE SHOWCASED
AT RADIO SHOW SESSION

–Radio Order-Up: Driving Meal Occasions for Restaurants to Serve Up Case Study Successes–

WASHINGTON, DC — The 2010 Radio Show will feature a panel of restaurant executives in a session that evaluates the varied approaches and successes of casual dining and quick service restaurant (QSR) advertisers. During the session, panelists will detail various marketing approaches used to continuously increase comp sales and traffic to their operations. The session, held as part of this week’s Radio Show in Washington, DC, will be moderated by Andrew Hampp, Los Angeles Bureau Chief for Advertising Age. The session will begin at 10:30 a.m. Friday in the conference theater of the Grand Hyatt Washington.

Shannon Pedersen Tuner, senior marketing manager, media, for Subway’s Franchisee Advertising Fund, is set to discuss strategic insights from the recently launched Subway Fresh Artists – a campaign geared to reach morning drive listeners to submit and compete in delivering “wake up” songs – and align with Subway’s “Build Your Better Breakfast” campaign.

James Beal, president and chief operating officer for Ledo Pizza will speak of his successes based on his vast experience in working directly with franchisees in marketing and store openings.

Don Fox, chief executive for Firehouse Sub’s will also be in attendance to share how they experienced a 10 percent sales jump in markets where the chain broadcast radio ads.

“These proof positive case studies represent great use of Radio with accountable metrics in a great turn around year for Radio. We are privileged to welcome these marketers and operators to the Radio Show on Friday,” stated Jeff Haley, president and CEO of the Radio Advertising Bureau.

About the Radio Show
The 2010 Radio Show, produced by the Radio Advertising Bureau (RAB) and the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), is taking place this week in Washington, DC. This year’s show brings radio broadcasters and industry colleagues together to share knowledge, discover the latest innovations, network with industry leaders and explore creative business strategies to help radio flourish in the digital age. To learn more about the 2010 Radio Show, visit www.RadioShowWeb.com.

For media inquiries or to register as press for the Radio Show, contact the the onsite newsroom staff at 202-239-4069.

About RAB
The Radio Advertising Bureau serves more than 6,000 member Radio stations in the U.S. and over 1,000 member networks, representative firms, broadcast vendors, and international organizations. RAB leads and participates in educational, research, sales, and advocacy programs that promote and advance Radio as a primary advertising medium. Learn more at www.rab.com.

About NAB
The National Association of Broadcasters is the premier advocacy association for America’s broadcasters. NAB advances radio and television interests in legislative, regulatory and public affairs. Through advocacy, education and innovation, NAB enables broadcasters to best serve their communities, strengthen their businesses and seize new opportunities in the digital age. Learn more at www.nab.org.

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What's New In Radio:

September 20th, 2010

CONSUMERS DESERVE RADIO-CAPABLE CELL PHONES

September 20th, 2010

RADIO LEADERS: CONSUMERS
DESERVE RADIO-CAPABLE CELL PHONES

WASHINGTON — Representatives from the National Association of Broadcasters wrote House and Senate leaders for both the Judiciary and the Commerce committees today to correct and clarify the record regarding “the important consumer benefit” that could be derived from “unlocking the mobile phone market and granting consumer access to radio’s free and unique offerings.” The letters were signed by NAB Joint Board Chair Steve Newberry, president and CEO of Kentucky-based Commonwealth Broadcasting; and NAB Radio Board Chair Caroline Beasley, executive vice president and CFO of Florida-based Beasley Broadcast Group.

Newberry and Beasley noted the strong weekly listenership — 239 million Americans age 12 and older — for free and local radio and highlighted the “crucial lifeline” provided by local radio stations during times of emergency and crises.

“Americans ought not be denied access to such a pivotal lifeline service,” they wrote.

The letter referenced a recent poll conducted by Harris Interactive, which showed that a sizable majority of American cell phone users would like the ability to listen to their favorite local radio stations through a built-in radio receiver on their mobile phone. Newberry and Beasley also noted the global demand for radio-capable cell phones, pointing out that a recent study predicted market penetration for radio-capable devices will reach 45 percent within the next year.

“Despite such global demand, much of the U.S. cell phone market remains founded upon exclusive contracts between consumer electronics manufacturers and mobile phone carriers, and consumers are being denied access to radio’s free services on many mobile phone devices for competitive reasons,” today’s letter explained. “Cell phone providers apparently would rather reap the revenue of data-intensive, fee-based streaming apps than offer consumers a free and local alternative.”

“In the end, this is an issue of consumer access,” wrote Newberry and Beasley. “Americans deserve better choices than what is being offered by gatekeeper mobile service providers. The demonstrated demand for radio-capable cell phones, coupled with local radio’s role as a lifeline service during times of crisis, are considerations we hope you will take into account as this debate continues.”

Today’s letters are available online in PDF format. (Judiciary Committees | Commerce Committees)

About NAB
The National Association of Broadcasters is the premier advocacy association for America’s broadcasters. NAB advances radio and television interests in legislative, regulatory and public affairs. Through advocacy, education and innovation, NAB enables broadcasters to best serve their communities, strengthen their businesses and seize new opportunities in the digital age. Learn more at www.nab.org.

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What's New In Radio:

September 15th, 2010

NAB HAILS NATIONWIDE POLL SHOWING

September 15th, 2010

NAB HAILS NATIONWIDE POLL SHOWING
CONSUMER DEMAND FOR RADIO-CAPABLE CELL PHONES

Would use a cell phone to access local radio stations
Click the image to view a larger graph.


Would consider a one-time fee of 30 cents for access to local stations
Click the image to view a larger graph.


Would find a radio-capable cell phone important during emergencies
Click the image to view a larger graph.

WASHINGTON — The National Association of Broadcasters today issued a statement applauding the results of a new nationwide poll conducted by Harris Interactive, which show that a sizeable majority of American cell phone users would like the ability to listen to their favorite local radio stations through a built-in radio receiver on their mobile phone. The survey, conducted as part of an online nationwide omnibus survey of 2,587 adults representing the U.S. general adult population, was conducted by Harris Interactive and commissioned by NAB.

“Today’s survey results demonstrate convincingly that there is significant demand for radio-capable cell phones in the United States,” said NAB Executive Vice President of Communications Dennis Wharton. “Unfortunately, most U.S. mobile phone users have been denied over-the-air access to their favorite free and local stations. With much of the U.S. cell phone market built upon exclusive contracts between carriers and manufacturers, most consumers are left paying for fee-based data-intensive streaming apps with no free, broadcast alternative.”

Today’s poll findings showed:

• Three-quarters (76 percent) of cell phone owners would consider paying a one-time fee of 30 cents to access local radio stations through a built-in radio chip.

• Local weather and music are the top reasons they would listen to their local stations on their cell phones.

• Seventy-three percent of cell phone owners indicated that having a radio built into their cell phone capable of providing local weather and emergency alerts in real-time would be “very” or “somewhat” important.

• While two thirds (66 percent) of adults would use a built-in radio, young adults are even more likely to use such a feature. Seventy-one percent of 18-44 year olds as well as 73 percent of single and never married adults indicated they would use a built-in radio to listen to local stations if their phone was equipped to receive local radio stations without using mobile apps or their cell phone provider’s data plan.

Today’s poll results, as released by Harris Interactive, are available online, and follow other recent studies evaluating the global demand for radio-enabled cell phones. A 2008 study from global market research firm TNS found that 45 percent of mobile users in Latin America and Asia cite AM/FM radio as one of their top three reasons for purchasing a mobile phone — making the feature more popular than Internet access, texting and a camera function. Another 2008 study, commissioned by NAB’s technology advocacy program, NAB FASTROAD, concluded that the growth of FM-capable mobile handsets is “very robust” from a global perspective, and expected to reach 45 percent, or 700 million handsets, by 2011.

Opining in a recent blog, NAB’s Wharton suggested what might be motivating U.S. wireless carriers and device manufacturers to prevent consumer access to FM-enabled cell phones: “It could be a simple case of anti-competitive behavior,” he wrote. “Every minute a cell phone user listens to free, local radio is one less minute spent using the wireless industry’s fee-based applications. Moreover, since listening to local radio would require no network bandwidth, cell phone subscribers wouldn’t be forced to pay the escalating rates associated with streaming data-rich, fee-based applications.”

About NAB
The National Association of Broadcasters is the premier advocacy association for America’s broadcasters. NAB advances radio and television interests in legislative, regulatory and public affairs. Through advocacy, education and innovation, NAB enables broadcasters to best serve their communities, strengthen their businesses and seize new opportunities in the digital age. Learn more at www.nab.org.

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